Shopping Cart
0 items
 
Water Resistance

 

A watch is NOT water resistant unless stated on the dial or case back.

Watches which are not noted as water resistant should not be worn whilst washing hands, dishes, showering etc.

 

Water Resistant Watches

The notation of water resistance to a given depth (e.g. 30m/3ATM, 50m/5ATM, 100m/10ATM) is based on the fact that the case has been designed to withstand a STATIC laboratory test to the stated depth for SHORT periods only.

Most water resistant watches are NOT designed for prolonged and active use in water.

The only watches designed to withstand these types of conditions are professional divers watches”.

 

3 BAR - WATER RESISTANT TO 30 METRES/3ATM/98FT 

Suitable for everyday use. Will withstand accidental splashing, but not suitable for swimming.

 

5 BAR - WATER RESISTANT TO 50 METRES/5ATM/164FT

Suitable for everyday use and swimming but NOT for poolside diving, snorkelling or water sports.

 

10 BAR - WATER RESISTANT TO 100 METRES/10ATM/328FT

Suitable for everyday use including swimming and snorkelling but NOT suitable for high board diving or sub-aqua diving.

 

20 BAR - WATER RESISTANT TO 200 METRES/20ATM/662FT

Suitable for all high impact water sports and scuba diving all depths NOT requiring helium gas. At these depths however it is recommended that a professional divers watch is purchased.

 

30/80/130 BAR - WATER RESISTANT TO 300/800/1300 METRES 30/80/130ATM/993/2648/4300FT

Suitable for all high impact water sports, scuba diving and saturation diving.

 

GENERAL POINTS

The figures quoted refer to STATIC pressure. The actual water pressure on the watch during use will be greater than the static pressure. For instance, diving pressure on the watch is clearly greater at the impact with the water during poolside diving. Condensation can also be a problem. A sealed watch is then suddenly plunged into water that is some degrees colder; moisture can then be created within the watch and become visible as small droplets under the glass. This normally dissipates of it’s own accord once the watch is removed from the water, but this is not always the case. The watch may then need to be returned to the watchmaker for inspection.